Other classifications

To make things easier to find, I created a few groupings that allow you to narrow down certain topics that include a large number of named individuals, geographical locations, or geopolitical entities. So in addition to the detailed name of the person, group or location I created the topics: people and groups; areas and nations; economists; and politicians (who, within it, include also nation state leaders and US presidents).

You can always use the search bar to look for a particular person or country. The autocomplete function will bring up the search results immediately as you type. But if you just can’t remember the name of the person or if you want to get some ideas by searching the broader category (e.g. “let’s see which economists have something written about them…”) this would be a great way to do it.

And sometimes you might just want to read a book that seems to have a wide variety of topics, like a primer on some broad topic or a book that will help you answer every question under the sun. In that case you may just want to filter with the word smorgasbord and see what books come up.

. . .

This concludes the series on Recommended Starting Points. I hope you found some useful content in here or, better yet, know that these posts exist so you come back here again when you start over looking for new topics to explore. And as always, thank you for reading!

Economics

The economics category, as expected, is very well represented within Books of Liberty. If I’d had to guess, I might even say most of the people coming to this site have an above average understanding of this subject compared to their peers.

Of all the economics books, around half are explicitly Austrian Economics texts, and (with a significant overlap) around half discuss monetary theory. You may search specifically for economic treatises or books about economists; you will find historical or theoretical accounts of financial crises; you will stumble upon recent books on crypto-currencies (like bitcoin), books covering topics like income or wealth inequality, as well as more technical subjects like price theory, monopoly, division of labor, public choice theory and others. Additionally, critiques of Keynesian economics are to be found throughout the books in this category.

Of the Austrian Economics books, the largest portion discuss The Austrian Business Cycle and praxeology or human action, but you will find many covering, to one degree or another, topics like time preference, capital and interest, subjective value, and economic calculation, to name a few.

And for those interested in currency or money, whether sound money or fiat money, you will find books arguing the benefits of the gold standard, debates on inflation and deflation, banking, central banks and the Federal Reserve specifically.

As you will see, there are very detailed topic tags in this sections and I’ve tried capturing the details accurately, but if I’ve missed or misapplied a topic, please feel free to contact us with any corrections.

At the heart of the free market system of unregulated, voluntary trade stands capitalism and its emphasis on private property. Unsurprisingly, a large collection of books are available on this subject, many of which outline quite clearly the fundamentals and the outcomes of capitalism, especially in contrast to other economic systems like socialism. Additional related topics, such as free trade, decentralization, risk, uncertainty, and the market process can be found in such books.

These books are extremely important! Economics is one of the fundamental topics where so many people seriously lack an understanding. I’m sure you know someone who might benefit to be pointed in this direction. Don’t keep Books of Liberty to yourself. And as always, thank you for reading!